Conference programs in a social world

Here we discuss how conference programs should interplay with external social networking systems like Twitter and Facebook. We will also discuss how currents systems fail.

Links from social network sites

Nowadays, the most common way to share information on the internet is by sharing links on social network sites like Twitter and Facebook. One common use case would be where one of the authors shares his/her presentation with co-authors or colleagues.

Although link sharing is very common and most Internet users take it for granted, the rising popularity of mobile devices and the use of native applications has made it a challenge. There are increasingly more cases where simple link sharing doesn’t work.

Currently Ponzu has some complications when sharing links across devices. More specifically, a link from the mobile website viewed on a smartphone, when viewed on a PC, will display the same mobile version. This is OK on Safari, Chrome or Firefox, but has issues on Internet Explorer. Similar situations occur when a PC link is viewed on a smartphone, etc.

If the conference has a native application for smartphones, the situation is often worse. These application usually have not assigned URLs to each presentation so sharing is simply impossible.

The current situation means that we are wasting golden opportunities to use social networks for marketing our conferences. Ponzu has limited support as of now, and will be improved to provide top-class social sharing.

Participants should be able to enter their own SNS accounts

In Ponzu, participants could enter their own SNS accounts such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Read & ResearchMap. We hope that this will help researchers to become more connected and more collaborative.

We believe that this was yet another first for a conference program.

Conclusion

We believe strongly that the scientific community should embrace social networks to enhance collaboration. Conferences, being social in nature, are an ideal place to trigger that trend. However, there are some roadblocks that are preventing this.

One particularly large roadblock is the focus on native applications for smartphones. Unless accompanied by a mobile website, these applications can actually prevent participants from spreading information to their network. We have to take this into consideration when choosing our mobile platforms.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *