“Jobs-to-be-done” in scientific conferences

Clayton Christensen often refers to “Jobs-to-be-done” as a way of thinking about innovation. “Jobs-to-be-done” is a concept that was brought forth by Bob Moesta and the example that is most often referred to is milkshake marketing.

In essence, “Jobs-to-be-done” means to focus on a product’s function and its job; to understand what job the customer wants to accomplish, and why they hired the product to help them do it. In contrast, traditional marketing is usually obsessed with product categories, customer categories, and competitors, etc. These are what 4P and 3C tells us to focus on, but they often steer us away from the job-to-be-done.

In this post, I want to look at the jobs-to-be-done for scientific conferences, what participants want to accomplish.

The way I see it, the job that conferences are hired to do are the following;

  1. Face-to-face discussions with your peers, especially with those whom you do not regularly communicate.
  2. Learn about other remotely related research (fields that you wouldn’t usually check up).
  3. Meet with old acquaintances.
  4. Training and encouragement for young researchers.

Conference systems other than Ponzu only address the second issue. They provide a way to search the abstracts and to schedule your time. Unfortunately, they tend to only have a primitive search interface which is useful only when you have a very good idea about which search keywords you should use. As such, their support for the jobs-to-be-done is very poor.

Ponzu was designed for the jobs above. Each of Ponzu’s features was envisioned as a way to assist either of the tasks.

We designed the “like” system to provide an initial connection which could bring together scientists who share a common interest, but have never met face-to-face. We have heard stories where researcher doing unrelated research have met and discussed after discovering each other through “likes”. The “like” system addresses the first job. In addition, getting “likes” is encouraging. We have heard stories of young researchers being delighted at receiving likes from renown scientists, and then sending emails to them.

Our search system uses Apache Solr as the backend, and as a result, our searches are ranked by relevancy. Furthermore, we provide excerpts of the text to assist discovery. More importantly, we list up all presentations by the same research group so that users can easily learn more about each author, and meet with them at the conference to discuss further. As a result of collaboration with DBCLS, we also display related presentations based on keyword data-mining. This empowers participants to complete the second job.

Ponzu provides private messaging. Additionally, at the MBSJ2012, we provided Yoruzemi (a BBS for nightly meet ups). These help with job number 3, meeting old acquaintances.

Other conference systems view conferences only from the perspective of a lone spectator. They consider conferences to be a vehicle for information transmission from the presenters to the the audience, similar to how books convey knowledge to readers. They borrow features from spectator-oriented media and websites, but do not understand the unique jobs that conferences help get done.

The difference between Ponzu and preceding conference systems is hence very conceptual and deep. The difference is not in the number of features. It is in how we view the role of scientific conferences in general and in our approach to the jobs-to-be-done.

Our future goals are to deepen our understanding of how conferences contribute to the advancement of science, and to design Ponzu to assist in these roles. We need to understand the jobs-to-get-done, and to get them done.

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